Goal 22: Be a Mentor or Find a Mentor #30Goals

Goal 22 of The 30 Goals Challenge 2011

“The power we have through networking is humbling, frightening, and exciting. Use it well.”~ Ruth Cohenson, @tearoof

Goal

Short-term- Find at least one teacher to mentor or find a mentor online.

Long-term- Continue mentoring that teacher long-term by communicating with him/her once a week through social media. When meeting with a person one-to-one use the tools we use for our professional networks online. This is a great way to show them how to use the tools and ease them into the journey.

Resources

**NOTE

Due to traveling, I am behind on posting the podcasts. I will try to get the podcasts up soon!

Challenge:
Mentor another teacher online for find a mentor!

Did you reflect on this goal? Please leave a comment that you accomplished this goal by either posting your own video reflection on Youtube, using the hashtag #30Goals, posting on the 30 Goals Facebook group, adding a post to the 43 Things web/mobile app, or adding a comment below! Feel free to subscribe to The 30 Goals podcast!

Keep an eye out for the book, The 30 Goals Challenge for Educators, that will be published by Eye on Education in the Fall of 2011!

Podcast is coming soon!

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Educating is About Passion, Let Us be Your Green Dots!

Recently, Scott Mcleod, blogged a very thought-provoking post, Are We Edubloggers too Harsh on Our Kids’ Teachers?

My initial thoughts….

As a teacher, I remember throughout my career parents who griped at me about something I didn’t do to their standards. It’s part of the job and I believe this will continue to happen throughout my career. Just the other day a great educator tweeted a parent withdrew his son from his class because he used technology. How many of us get the third degree from parents, administrators, and other teachers for using technology in our curriculum? I bet many of us, because not all are on board and they have their presumptions. Dealing with parents is part of our job. The way I take it is that I rather have parents who care so much to be involved in their child’s education than not at all.

I think we should expect educators and administrators to prepare students for their future successfully. They don’t necessarily have to use web 2.0 tools, but the majority of the curriculum shouldn’t be students completing worksheets, buried in a textbook for hours, or filling out and being prepared for bubble tests. I want my child’s teacher to inspire a passion for continuously learning or to nurture my child’s curiosity. I don’t want my child to hate or be bored with learning. I don’t want my child to be conditioned to think there is only one correct answer to a question, accept rules that have never been explained or else, or to be brainwashed into believing that achievement in life is measured by how well they perform on tests that measure how well you perform lower-level skills and not creativity.

It’s not about the technology….

I’ve seen teachers motivate students to learn without much technology and I applaud them for being passionate and motivating students. What is important is if the child is engaged, problem-solving, and learning how to collaborate with their peers. Yes, I would want the educators who I communicate with on Twitter, Facebook, through this blog, and other online tools to teach my child not because you use technology or know what I mean when I write Glogster, Wikis, Voicethread, Web 2.0, avatar….

I would want you to teach my child, because…

  • you’re passionate about educating and motivating your students
  • you engage in professional development almost daily
  • you love to learn from other educators
  • you love to be inspired and inspire others
  • you collaborate with educators worldwide and get your students to collaborate with their students

I don’t know why we expect parents to stay silent when it comes to their own children, especially if they are also educators. Educators are preparing children to be future CEOs, engineers, politicians, teachers, and more. Being an educator is a serious calling and if we treat it like less then we don’t give it that respect.

Being a green dot….

I’m not advocating that educators in our Personal Learning Networks (PLN) should tell teachers their instructional practices are crap. Instead, I like Kelly Tenkely’s recent post, Be the Green Dot, which was inspired by this incredible post by Seth Godin, How Big is Your Red Zone?. Seth Godin and Kelly illustrate 3 graphs which I have embedded below. These graphs show how teachers not in our PLN react to learning about the innovative practices we are exposed to often by having ongoing professional development from our peers. A majority of educators do not participate in online educator communities so they experience an initial frustration when we share with them resources, links, blog posts, and tools (see the red graph). However, these educators do eventually experience joy (see the blue graph) when they get the hang of it and discover effective ways to engage students. The red zone in the last graph shows the gap between the initial hassle and the joy. This is the critical period when educators are resistant to us sharing with them the innovative practices we are exposed to daily. They believe we are hassling them and often make this very clear in their behavior toward us.

So how do we get these educators to the point where they feel joy about learning about these innovative practices?

Seth Godin writes in his blog:

My contention is that the only reason we ever get through that gap is that someone on the other side (the little green circle) is rooting us on, or telling us stories of how great it is on the other side. The bigger your red zone, the louder your green dot needs to be. Every successful product or passion is either easy to get started on or comes with a built-in motivator to keep you moving until you’re in. This is so easy to overlook, because of course you’re already in…

That green dot is you and me! Our PLN are the green dots that need to be loud with our motivation!

A final thought….

Yes, we should definitely share with teachers, administrators, and staff resources to help them with their professional development and have them become part of the conversation. We should root them on when they try new things and encourage to persist, eventually, they will learn and they will be better educators for the development. No, we shouldn’t be silent. We are preparing children to someday be in charge of their world! A caring parent’s role is to ensure his/her child is prepared to take the reigns armed with the creativity, imagination, tenacity to search for solutions, and collaborative skills needed.

Challenge:

Let’s be green dots and motivate loudly with passion and share resources with those not in our PLN.

If you enjoyed this post, you may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates!

What are your ideas and resources on motivating educators who do not participate in educator communities (PLNs)?

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What Did They Tweet?

2nd Week of June 2010 edition of the What Did They Tweet weekly series!

Let’s see what our Personal Learning Network (PLN) tweeted about in education and social media.

Multimedia Tweets


“It Doesn’t Hurt to Reflect on Your Life Every Now and Then| The Committed Sardine” http://j.mp/cCHFaK <~amazing video!


To share with your seniors, the last 18 years in rap http://vimeo.com/12103191

The Last 18 Years In Rap from Week in Rap on Vimeo.


RT @esolcourses: Edtech Song – The Remix… Fabulous New Animated Video Version – go check it out! http://bit.ly/d4saXS #edtech #elt #esl :)


Wow! Best description of PLN ever from @skipvia http://bit.ly/cHtgRl. Found it at http://edupln.ning.com.


This video has been added to the post, 19 Resources About Personal Learning Networks (PLNs).


@ShellTerrell #30goals hoping to add 15 bids to www.learnitin5.com.


This video has been added to the Voki resources on the Technology for Kids Wiki.

Resources

Opportunities for Educators

Below is a list of great opportunities for free resources and more:

If you enjoy this series, you may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates!

For more tweets, check out these posts:

Challenge:

Share one of these resources with another educator not on Twitter. Then tell them you got the tip from educators on Twitter!

What was your favorite resource on Twitter this week?


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What Did They Tweet?

June 2010 edition of the What Did They Tweet weekly series!

Let’s see what our Personal Learning Network (PLN) tweeted about in education and social media for the last two weeks.

Multimedia Tweets


A site worth bookmarking. 100 Great Tech Talks for Educators. http://bit.ly/bZF3qx

Below is one of the videos, Richard Baraniuk on open-source learning.


Prezi I’ve created for PD on using Twitter for PLN. Any comments welcome! http://bit.ly/bXOTvN #edtech #PLN


Art teachers will love this free program and this is excellent for students creating characters for stop motion films.


Pretty cool ‘How to’ Insert animations in Prezi by Balázs Turai http://bit.ly/dv0zPZ

Resources

Opportunities for Educators

Below is a list of great opportunities for free resources and more:

  • If you are in the DC area and an educator you will be able to attend the 140 Conference for nearly half the price! Register here! I will post more details about the education panel on this blog!
  • Freelance education bloggers are wanted! You will get paid! Might be nice for extra cash in the summer!More details here!

If you enjoy this series, you may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates!

For more tweets, check out these posts:

Challenge:

Share one of these resources with another educator not on Twitter. Then tell them you got the tip from educators on Twitter!

What was your favorite resource on Twitter this week?


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May in Review: What You May Have Missed

Many of you are wrapping up the year. In the midst of the madness you may have missed some of the tips, resources, and tools shared on Teacher Reboot Camp.

What you might have missed…

Your favorite posts this month based on comments and overall traffic:

  • How Do We Nurture Passion?- Be inspired by the passion of 6th grader, Greyson Chance, who takes the world by storm with his musical talent. How do we inspire every student to be brave enough to show their passion? As educators how can we ensure we are passing our passion for learning and knowledge to our students?
  • A New Way to Make PowerPoints Interactive- In this post, I shared how you can use the free Microsoft Microsoft Mouse Mischief software and a set of wireless mouse devices to make PowerPoint lessons interactive. I also provided several lesson ideas and resources.
  • New Series: Children of Immigrants- This new series is in response to the several laws and educational policies that are recently targeting immigrants and their children. In this post,Struggling with the Dialect, I share with you how my parents were able to help my four sisters and I break the poverty cycle and graduate from college. We celebrated the Teacher Reboot Camp blog’s birthday and you were able to find out about my life growing up as a Chicana in South Texas.
  • Favorite Cool Sites Series- In this post, you can find 17 resources, articles, presentations, and videos that will help you with your presentations on Personal/Passionate/Professional Learning Networks (PLNs).
  • Favorite What Did They Tweet Series- In this post, our PLN shared with us Sir Ken Robinson’s newest TED Talk, A Jedi Approach to Professional Development, Creative Common presentation slides of great quotes, Daniel Pink’s animated Drive video and more!
  • My Favorite Tech Tools & Resources This Month-
    • Google Wave- It is now open for everyone. You don’t need an invite. In this post you will find 25 Google Wave resources to get you waving with other educators!
    • Voki- Students can develop characters, add scenery, and add their voices to these free avatars! These are easily embedded in a wiki or blog. This post will get you started!
    • Twitter Parade-See all your followers in a fun parade with you as the star! You can here cheers and music. You can embed this in your blog or wiki.
  • Guest Posts- A heartfelt thanks to all my guest bloggers this month! Please leave them comments on their fantastic posts!
    • If you would like to contribute to this blog, please e-mail me at ShellyTerrell at gmail.com.
  • My Wikis and Presentations:
    • We Connect- Updated! This is my PLN wiki where you will find several resources, tutorials, videos and more on helping educators join a PLN. Please feel free to use the resources in your presentations on PLNs and social media.
    • Technology 4 Kids- Updated with new Skype resources! Ozge Karaoglu and I developed this wiki to help educators integrate technology effectively for young learners. Read about digital storytelling tools, Glogster, Voicethread, and more!
  • My Guest posts!
    • Check out these ideas on, Goal-Setting with Wallwisher, that is on the Prestwick blog. You will see how I get my students to reflect at the end of the year on their learning goals.
    • In the Peoplegogy blog, I talk about the importance of rookie teachers participating in PLNs and using social media tools.
    • Check out these ideas on, Motivating Adult Learners by Skyping an Expert, that is on the OUP ELT Global blog. You will see how I get my students to reflect at the end of the year on their learning goals.
    • Check out these ideas on, Using Wikis and Games with Students, that is on the Digital ELT Play blog. You will see how to motivate students to practice English at home.
    • I write the weekly summaries for Parentella’s #PTChat, the parent and educator discussion, which occurs every Wednesday at 9pm PST.

Thank you so much for your support of my free 30 Goals Challenge E-book. Over 1500 of you have read it and I am truly grateful! Download your free copy here.

Please feel free to use any of the resources shared here or in the wikis because the ultimate goal is to get other educators involved in our PLN.

You may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates!


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