Student Reflection with Digital Portfolios

Included in the Digital Ideas Advent Calendar with a new idea each day!

Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action. – Peter Drucker

A year ago, I created a technology course on Moodle for Spanish teachers as part of the Ministry of Education of Spain. The teachers are very new to web tools, developing Personal Learning Networks (PLNs) and are currently teaching full time. The course is task based and I’m fortunate to be one of the instructors. The course will soon be over so I am grading their reflective eportfolio final projects. I look forward to grading their reflective eportfolios, because this is when my students begin to look back at their learning journey and see how much they’ve grown. Three months ago these teachers were new to integrating digital storytelling projects, integrating technology, social bookmarking, and connecting with teachers online. After the course, they have contributed to our collaborative Pinterest boards, created and shared on Twitter, attempted missions and received digital badges, and kept digital portfolios. Many students let me know how much they appreciate learning about technology integration and how to develop PLNs, which you can see from the tweet I received from one of my students below. Keep reading to discover how to get your students reflecting on their learning in your course with a digital portfolio.

 

Creating Reflective Portfolio Presentations

Students are asked to create a reflective audio/visual presentation in which they reflect on a task, reading, and resource (tool, app, website, game, database, video or program) for each module. Their presentations should include screenshots, links, and examples. Students are asked to describe what they learned from the resources and explain how they will specifically apply this knowledge in the real world. More instructions are included in the slide presentation below, which is free to download. 

Recommended Tools

I recommend these tools for completing these projects: these tools for completing this project:

  • Prezi- multimedia presentation tool that embeds video with cool transitions
  • VoiceThread – multimedia shows you can add video or audio commentary to
  • Present.me – use video to narrate a slideshow
  • TouchCast- create a multimedia, interactive video with clickable links
  • Capzles -looks like a timeline. Add video, pdfs, etc.
  • Educlipper- curation tool like Pinterest with the ability to add audio and video commentary

Student ePortfolio Reflections

These are some examples of their eportfolios. Find more in this Pinterest board.

 

Challenge: Have your students reflect on their learning for the semester.

If you enjoyed these ideas, you may want to get your copy of The 30 Goals for Teachers or my $5.99 ebook, Learning to Go, which has digital/mobile activities for any device and editable/printable handouts and rubrics. Subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates!

Included in the Digital Ideas Advent Calendar! Scroll the image below and each day discover free web tools, apps, and resources.

Bookmark and Share

Read More

Ways to Get Technology into Your Classrooms

Included in the Digital Ideas Advent Calendar with a new idea each day!

I’ve been quite blessed to travel to over 20 countries and help teachers integrate technology even in places with very little funding. You can watch a video of me helping students in Ogulin, Croatia to get an idea of what this looks like in action. Often, we are not fortunate to work in schools that provide us with the budget to get the technology we want. If you have a passion for teaching with tablets, Chromebooks, or setting up a digital station then you have many ways to afford that dream. Don’t give up! Below, are ways to fund your vision whether it be a maker station, 3D printer, or other project. Don’t forget to check out my previous post, on getting your students to create digital books to help others. Students have the ability to publish and sell their digital books online. The proceeds can go towards getting computers, laptops, tablets, better wifi, a technology cart, or other digital tools.

Ideas

Find the ideas below in the bookmarks that follow or click on this link, Tech Funding.

Make a wish list or a project plan that you can share with students, parents, universities, local businesses, or other audiences to help you reach your goals. Often, you can get universities, churches, or businesses to donate their old technology to you when they make updates or get new inventory. This benefits them, especially when they can write it off for taxes.

Crowdfunding- Many sites will allow you to raise funds for a project by asking people around the world for small donations. Try DonorsChoose, DigitalWish, AdoptaClassroom, ClassWish, Indigogo, or KickStart.

Grants- You can apply for grants specifically meant for your topic. Try WeAreTeachers, GrantGopher, or NaNoWrimo.

Pilot programs- Often big companies like MicroSoft or Verizon will want to run pilot programs worldwide and provide your school with tons of their devices.

Develop an app that helps the community in some way or develop a game on an app. A group of kindergarten students created drawings for a version of MouthOff. Other schools have worked with developers to get their students to create an app. Find resources and places below to make an app easily. AppShed is a great tool for making apps.

Think of creative ways to fundraise! I have been part of celebrity dinners where students dressed as famous characters and served tables dinner. We also did a coffee and talent night with students reading poetry or playing music. You can discover tons of ideas in the bookmarks below.

Challenge:

Come up with a plan or project for your class and try one of these ideas to fund it.

If you enjoyed these ideas, you may want to get your copy of The 30 Goals for Teachers or my $5.99 ebook, Learning to Go, which has digital/mobile activities for any device and editable/printable handouts and rubrics. Subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates!

Links

Included in the Digital Ideas Advent Calendar! Scroll the image below and each day discover free web tools, apps, and resources.

Bookmark and Share

Read More

Byte-sized Potential: Can Compassion & Citizenship Go Viral?

Screen Shot 2014-05-06 at 4.44.59 PMPart of the category, Byte-sized Potential

The number one benefit of educational technology is that it empowers people to do what they want to do. It lets people be creative. It lets people be productive. It lets people learn things they didn’t think they could learn before, and so in a sense it is all about potential. – Steve Ballmer

A thousand years ago, books were accessible to a select few. Often, you needed to be part of a certain social class, ethnicity, and profession. Knowledge was not available to the majority of the world. I feel incredibly blessed to live at a time when technological developments continue to strive to provide access to the entire world. The most powerful learning and communication tools are in the hands of millions worldwide. Individuals can take classes from MIT professors or connect with the greatest minds, like Neil Degrasse Tyson, through social media.

Byte-sized Potential

In addition to having access to incredible learning, we have the potential to impact the world through social media. Each tweet, Instagram image, Vine/Youtube video, and status update has the potential to go viral. It will be shared. It will spread. If our messages and digital behavior have an audience, then we need to make them matter. What will our students do with this potential? We need to get our students to realize their byte-size potential and feel the weight of this potential. They need to realize the responsibilities that come with their digital actions and also realize they are privileged to live in a world of access where they can truly pursue their passions and make a meaningful impact.

What are learners currently doing with their access? 

Anyone, anywhere in the world has the potential to be viral. They can be the next Idol, X-Factor, Youtuber, Viner, Meme, gif, trend, or hashtag. Kids and teens already use their access to impact millions with the messages they spread. They have the power to incite their followers to action. For example, the most popular Viner is 16 year-old, Nash Grier, with over 7 million followers.

The education system has failed them. Even now as they craft their next 6-second video, tweet, snap, post, status update, hashtag, and meme they won’t carry the weight or compassion of their privilege and position to be the first generation able to create viral action and messages. The movements they incite have the potential to heal, inspire, or destroy people. We will feel this as another cyberbullying incident or sexting scandal arises. Teachers have the ability to change these behaviors by teaching citizenship daily. We can inspire our students daily to publish, post, and spread in meaningful ways.

Join my movement with these free resources

I realize many teachers face barriers when teaching citizenship. They may not be allowed to teach with technology, have proper training, lack a digital literacy and citizenship curriculum, and be short on time. My goal this year is to help teachers inspire their learners to make their digital behavior matter. Currently, I am working on a book with 50 ways to get our students to spread compassion, caring, and kindness on the web. The book is based on Ed Lorenz’s Butterfly Effect and also my 30 Goals Challenge for Educators experience. Right now I’m sharing these ideas in various ways. Find them in my recent Reinvent the Classroom Keynote: Byte-Size Potential. Below are the slides to download and a Youtube video of the keynote. You can also access the recent Twitter Chat transcript for the #Edtechchat I hosted, which is full of resources from over 400 teachers. I also have created a new category on this blog, Byte-sized Potential, full of ideas on how to get our students using their access responsibly. You will find free digital citizenship and literacy resources as well as ideas like teaching with Vine, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Will you join me this year in getting our students to help spread compassion and citizenship?

Video Recording of the Keynote

Edtechchat Transcript
Special thanks to all #Edtechchat moderators and participants for a lively conversation this past Monday, May 5th. Join #Edtechchat every Monday at 8pmET.

Challenge:

Join me in giving our students the mission to spread compassion and citizenship.

If you enjoyed this post, you may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates or subscribe to the Teacher Reboot Camp free eNewsletter to receive resources like these and updates on free professional development events!

Bookmark and Share

Read More

Reblog? Vine? Memes? Sharing Bite-sized Narratives

“The most important thing any teacher has to learn can be expressed in seven words: Learning is not the product of teaching. Learning is the product of the activity of learners.” – John Holt

The way we learn, share, and communicate has been impacted by mobile devices. In my recent webinar, Sharing the Narratives of Our Lives: Meaningful Learning with Mobile Devices, I shared examples of the different ways individuals are using apps and mobile devices to communicate, connect, and express themselves. We can take these learning rituals and help support our students in being authors, producers, directors, and creators. I also talked about the new ways millions of us are sharing the narratives of our lives, through trends like reblogging, memes, vines, animated gifs, emojis, and ephemeral apps.

If you missed it, here’s the recording http://itdipro.adobeconnect.com/p9tg9nlbyv6/ and download the slides.

Many of us are unaware of the way millions (including our students) create, produce, direct, summarize, translate, and share stories outside of learning institutions. All around the world, millions share the narratives of their lives through text, status updates on Facebook, tweets, images, and short videos. We share bite-sized chunks of our life stories in 140 characters, six second-videos, or memed images with a few words. That is why I created the 15 second video trailer below. This is the maximum time allowed to create Instagram videos. If you want to create a Vine video, you only get six seconds.

Summarizing a story into meaningful bite-sized chunks takes skill. According to David Crystal, students are writing more with technology than we could have ever written in the past (Spotlight-verlag.de/aktionen/pdf/spotlight/magazin.pdf). They are blogging, microblogging, reblogging, videocasting, and texting constantly throughout the day. Their daily rituals include scanning streams of bite-sized information and responding to these narratives and knowledge through likes, comments, retweets, reposts, or reblogs.

Reference

Crystal, D. (2008, November). The joy of txt. Spotlight, 16-21. From:  http://ww.davidcrystal.com/David_Crystal/internet.htm

Challenge:

Travel around the web and observe the way people communicate and learn in different social networks like Vine, Youtube, Facebook, and Twitter. What trends do you notice?

If you enjoyed this post, you may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates or subscribe to the Teacher Reboot Camp free eNewsletter to receive resources like these and updates on free professional development events!

Bookmark and Share

Read More

The 2nd Issue of the Teacher Reboot Camp eNewsletter

rosco me glassesHere is the 2nd issue of the new Teacher Reboot Camp eNewsletter. In this issue find free apps, web tools, resources, lesson ideas, professional development opportunities, and more.  Be inspired by the latest Edugems, discover a few of the top posts at Teacher Reboot Camp, and keep posted about The 30 Goals Challenge for Educators and the Reform Symposium Free E-Conference. You can subscribe for free at https://tinyletter.com/shellyterrell. You will get 1 to 3 newsletters per month.

Below, I have posted the current newsletter, http://bit.ly/trc19feb2014. Download this as a pdf file by clicking here,  https://app.box.com/s/vw2e1gmlycsoq5lbyxz1. This issue’s Edugems are: Fabiana Casella, Dr. Nellie Deutsch, John Spencer, and Graham Stanley. Thank you so much for your support!

 

Challenge:

Thank one of the Edugems for their resources!

If you enjoyed this post, you may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates or subscribe to the Teacher Reboot Camp free  eNewsletter to receive resources like these and updates on free professional development events!

Bookmark and Share

Read More