Ideas for Promoting Digital Diversity

Photo by Shermeee, Flic.kr/p/6211rAFor the next week, I will be participating in many events to support gender and cultural diversity in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields. Below find a list of these events and ideas for promoting digital diversity.

Research points to low percentages of females and minorities pursuing STEM degrees and professions. The National Association of Women in Technology reported 26% of the computing workforce in 2013 were women (5% Asian women, 3% African American women, and 2% Hispanic women) and there was a 64% decline in the number of first-year undergraduate women interested in majoring in Computer Science between 2000 and 2012. Additionally, females worldwide have higher quit rates in STEM professions. The Center for Talent Innovation reported the female quit rate was 45% in the US, 29% in Brazil, and 50% in China. The Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings conducted a survey in 2015 of 557 women in STEM and interviewed 60 minority women in STEM. 100% of the women interviewed reported gender bias.

Upcoming Events

Ideas for Supporting Digital Diversity

Cori Coburn-Shiflett, Rafranz Davis, Sarah Thomas, and I are sharing resources to help you promote Digital Diversity on our site. Below are some of these ideas to help you promote digital diversity in your classes and schools.

  • Update your materials to include innovators, developers, and visionaries of diverse backgrounds, genders, and ages.
  • Invite STEM innovators of diverse backgrounds to inspire your students as guest speakers.
  • Ask local STEM professionals to conduct experiments with your students.
    • In the past, local experts have worked with my students to examine the microorganisms in our river water, search for fossils, explore caves, build adobe structures, create shoes and materials with local plants, act as meteorologists, and much more.
    • Find STEM professionals through museums, companies, Toast Masters, universities, the chamber of commerce, trade associations, or speakers bureaus.
  • Ask local STEM professionals to mentor your students.
  • Get students to interview STEM innovators virtually.
    • Students can host a Google Hangout or Skype with the guest speaker.
    • Students can host a Twitter chat with the guest speaker.
    • Find more ideas and resources in my presentation, Inspire Learners with Guest Speakers.
  • Rethink how you teach STEM. STEM isn’t learned solely from a textbook. Most of your lessons should get students to investigate the world around them with math, science, and technology. Get students to experiment, explore, problem-solve, invent, create, and code.
  • Help all students to believe in their abilities to learn math, science and technology. Our students often come to us believing they aren’t good at math, science, technology, etc. In my book, The 30 Goals Challenge for Teachers, I talk about the need to help students destroy these labels so that they truly engage with our content.
  • Introduce your students to the realities of their lifelong learning journeys. The best learning is a journey full of challenging obstacles that get us to step out of our comfort zones. Only through undergoing this journey do we discover our strengths and skills.

Challenge:

Actively support diversity in STEM!

If you enjoyed these ideas, you may want to get your copy of The 30 Goals for Teachers or my $5.99 ebook, Learning to Go, which has digital/mobile activities for any device and editable/printable handouts and rubrics.

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Be Inspired! Free! Online! #RSCON5, Sun. Apr. 6

Join us this Sunday, April 6th! Professional Development in your PJs. Only 4 hours. You can even join our Technology Smackdown and present your favorite web tools or apps. Find all the web room links here. Just click on the green links on this page and a Blackboard Collaborate room will popup. Check your time zone here, Bit.ly/rscontz46.Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 7.11.22 PM

If you enjoyed this post, you may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates or subscribe to the Teacher Reboot Camp free eNewsletter to receive resources like these and updates on free professional development events!

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This Week’s Reboot (3rd Edition of the TRC Newsletter)

This is the 3rd issue of the new Teacher Reboot Camp eNewsletter. In this issue find free apps, web tools, resources, lesson ideas, professional development opportunities, and more.  Be inspired by the latest Edugems, discover a few of the top posts at Teacher Reboot Camp, and keep posted about The 30 Goals Challenge for Educators and the Reform Symposium Free E-Conference. You can subscribe for free at https://tinyletter.com/shellyterrell. You will get 1 to 3 newsletters per month.

Below, I have posted the current newsletter. Download this as a pdf file by clicking  https://app.box.com/trc2014news. This issue’s Edugems are: Jeffery Heil, Joe Mazza, Daniel Brown, Tom Whitby, and Esnart Chapomba. Thank you so much for your support!

Challenge:

Thank one of the Edugems for their resources!

If you enjoyed this post, you may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates or subscribe to the Teacher Reboot Camp free  eNewsletter to receive resources like these and updates on free professional development events!

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New Ways We Share the Narratives of Our Lives

“The most important thing any teacher has to learn can be expressed in seven words: Learning is not the product of teaching. Learning is the product of the activity of learners.” – John Holt

All around the world, millions share the narratives of their lives through text, status updates on Facebook, tweets, images, and short videos. We share bite-sized chunks of our life stories in 140 characters, six second-videos, or memed images with a few words. That is why I created the 15 second video trailer above. This is the maximum time allowed to create Instagram videos. If you want to create a Vine video, you only get six seconds. Summarizing a story into bite-sized chunks takes skill. Bite-size language doesn’t equate to low literacy or learning.

The way we learn, share, and communicate has been impacted by mobile devices. Many of us are unaware of the way millions of our students are learning outside of school. In some stories, the images (emojis or stickers) become the letters and words of a different visual language developed through mobile technology. According to David Crystal, students are writing more with technology than we could have ever written in the past. They are blogging, microblogging, and texting constantly. They are also reading daily and responding to their peers’ written narratives by likes, comments, or reblogs. They will take what someone else created and build upon it, adding their own personal touch and humor.

Reference

Crystal, D. (2008, November). The joy of txt. Spotlight, 16-21. From: http://ww.davidcrystal.com/David_Crystal/internet.htm

Challenge:

Travel around the web and observe the way people communicate and learn in different social networks like Vine, Youtube, Facebook, and Twitter. What trends do you notice?

If you enjoyed this post, you may want to subscribe for FREE to receive regular updates or subscribe to the Teacher Reboot Camp free eNewsletter to receive resources like these and updates on free professional development events!

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Getting Schooled

Today, I’m taking part in  a discussion hosted by America Tonight, which has launched a special series, “Getting Schooled,” about the challenges in our education system, and what it would take to improve it. Every night, Monday to Friday, they share a new report looking at everything from the parents who risk jail time to send their children to better schools in other districts to an innovative plan to ‘flip’ classrooms in order to enhance performance. The series explores a range of issues, but there’s one theme that stands out: how to address inequality in the education system. Watch the series here and  this is the Branch discussion taking place now.

Guests include:

  • Soledad O’Brien, special correspondent, America Tonight
  • Shelly Terrell, #Edchat co-founder, author of “The 30 Goals Challenge”
  • Alexander Russo, education writer and editor who runs the This Week in Education and District 299 Chicago Public Schools blogs
  • Patrick Riccards, education advocate and editor at EduFlack
  • Mike Klonsky, educator and education blogger from the Chicago area
  • Dr. Bahiyyah Muhammad, criminologist and assistant professor at Howard University
  • Gina Womack, executive director of Families and Friends of Louisiana’s Incarcerated Children
  • Nancy K. Cauthen, sociologist and education author who writes about poverty and improving children’s odds for success at changethestakes.org

A Trailer of the Series


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